Teacher on the Trail

An ‘Adventure Learning’ project that provides incredible opportunities for educators.


Teachers discover featured Insider Videos selected by the Iditarod EDU team.


Your one stop shop for following Iditarod. Mushers, checkpoints, GPS Tracker, standings, videos and more.

    
    
    
    
    

Latest Teacher on the Trail Posts

U is for Unalakleet: Flying Through Nulato

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 U is for Unalakleet Unalakeet is one of sixteen checkpoints the 2017 Iditarod will travel through.  It is the largest village on the trail between Anchorage and Nome with a population of about 900 people.  The first musher to reach Unalakleet receives the “Wells Fargo Gold Coast Award” which includes $3,500 …

T is for Tanana: A Quiet Morning in Galena

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 T is for Tanana Tanana is a checkpoint on the 2017 Iditarod.  This is the third time the race has gone through the village.  Currently there are 248 people who call Tanana home, and there are 42 students in the school.  This year the village will host the “First to the …

S is for Sled: Fun in Galena

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 S is Sled: Fun in Galena The first sleds were traditionally made of wood, but today they are much more high-tech.  Many mushers today make their sleds from a variety of materials, including hockey sticks.  The sled hold all the mushers’ gear including extra dog booties, dog food, cooker, snow shoes, …

R is for Red Lantern: Ruby and Galena

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 R is for Red Lantern The Red Lantern Award is given to the last musher to reach Nome.  This award is given to honor the perseverance of the musher and their team.  First Red Lantern Award winner was John Schultz with a finishing time of 32 days, 5 hours, 9 minutes, …

Q is for Quiet: Double the Honor in Ruby

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 Q is for the Quiet Quiet is a great word to discuss the Alaskan wilderness.  As mushers and teams make their way to Nome, there is a lot of quiet along the trail.  They pass through parts of the state that is home only to the animals that live there.  When …

A Great Day in Tanana

  Tanana has been such a welcoming community since the minute my plane landed.  Upon arrival Shannon, a wonderful local woman, picked a small group of us up and brought us to the community center.  On our drive in she pointed out where the Native Hospital used to be, where the local store is, and …

P is for Parka: Chilly Night in Nenana

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 P is for Parka A parka is a large windproof jacket with a hood, which is designed to be worn in the cold weather.  Each musher has a parka that is worn on the trail to protect them from the extremely cold temperatures.   Very often a parka will have a fur …

O is for Optimism: Let the Race Begin!

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 O is for Optimism Optimism is defined as the hopefulness and confidence about the future or the successful outcome of something.  As the race began today, there was lots of optimism at the start line.  The optimism of rookie musher, Roger Lee, was quite evident as his team neared the start …

N is for Nome

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 N is for Nome Nome is home to the finish line of the Iditarod.  The town is located on the Seward Peninsula  Nome was once a booming gold mining town of over 30,000 gold seekers, but the current population is down to only about 3,600 people.  Now, each March between 50-70 …

M is for Musher: Ceremonial Start

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 M is for Musher A musher is the driver of a dog sled team.  All 72 mushers picked their starting position on Thursday, March 2 at the Musher Banquet.  There are seventeen women and fifty-five men racing this year.  Ryan Redington will be leading out the group wearing bib #2, and …