Teacher's Journal

Alaska Sealife Center: Distance Learning

Counting the Iditarod SEVEN Checkpoints Visited by the Teacher on the Trail This year I had the opportunity to visit seven villages along the Iditarod Trail: Nenana, Tanana, Ruby, Galena, Nulato, Elim, and White Mountain.  Each checkpoint was unique, and they were all excited to have the mushers, dogs, and volunteers visit their village.  In …

A Walk Through Nome…

Counting the Iditarod 2017 FIVE Former Champions Five former champions raced in the 2017 Iditarod.  Of those five mushers, they hold a combined 16 championships.  Dallas Seavey, Jeff King, and Martin Buser all have four Iditarod wins.  Mitch Seavey has three wins, and John Baker has one win.  Dallas is the youngest musher to win …

Beads of Courage

Counting the Iditarod 2017 THREE Beads of Courage Mushers, veterinarians, and I carried “Beads of Courage” down the trail this year.  Beads of Courage provides innovative, arts-in-medicine supportive care programs for children coping with serious illness, their families and the health care providers who care for them.  After travelling down the Iditarod trail 1,000 miles …

A Beautiful Day in Nome

Counting the Iditarod 2017 ONE Musher Wins the Iditarod Mitch Seavey was the first musher to Nome this year.  Mitch finished the race in 8 days, 3 hours, 40 minutes, and 13 seconds.  He is the oldest musher to win the Iditarod at the age of 57.  Mitch also won the Iditarod in 2004 and …

Z is for Zirkle: A St. Patrick’s Day in Nome!

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 Z is for Zirkle Aliy Zirkle is a veteran Iditarod musher.  Aliy finished her 17th Iditarod this year in 8th place.  Aliy first started mushing after moving to Alaska in 1990.  Aliy and her husband, Allen Moore, run SP Kennel which is named after Aliy’s first Alaskan husky, Skunk.  Aliy has …

Y is for Young Mushers: Girl Power on the Trail

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 Y is for Young Mushers There are many young mushers out on the trail this year.  A musher must be 18 before the Iditarod starts in order to race.  This year’s youngest musher is Laura Neese, 20 years old,  who finished in 42nd place.  There are eleven mushers that are 30 years …

X is for X-Back Harness: Lessons from Pictures

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 X is for X-Back Harness The x-back harness is a type of harness that most mushers use with their dogs.  The harness is designed for speed and comfort.  The x-back keeps the harness in place, and doesn’t disrupt the dog’s gait.  X is for X-Back Harness The top 25 mushers have …

W is for Wade Marrs: An Iditarod Finish

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 W is for Wade Marrs Wade Marrs is a musher from Knik, AK, but today resides in Willow, AK.  His kennel is Stump Jumpin’ Kennel and is home to over 50 dogs.  Wade began mushing at a young age, and ran his first Iditarod in 2009.  He has two top ten …

V is for Volunteer: Making the Iditarod Go ‘Round

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 V is for Volunteers A volunteer is a person who freely offers to do something.  The Iditarod is an event that could not go on without the volunteers that come out from around the world.  At every checkpoint there are volunteer veterinarians, trail crew, and communications people who keep the race …

U is for Unalakleet: Flying Through Nulato

The Iditarod Alphabet 2017 U is for Unalakleet Unalakeet is one of sixteen checkpoints the 2017 Iditarod will travel through.  It is the largest village on the trail between Anchorage and Nome with a population of about 900 people.  The first musher to reach Unalakleet receives the “Wells Fargo Gold Coast Award” which includes $3,500 …