Welcome to Iditarod EDU!

Engaging lessons based on Insider video clips.


Our four-legged correspondents write for all ages.


Collection of all things Iditarod.

    
    
    
    

 

Latest EDU Posts

Update from the Teacher on the Trail™

  2020 was certainly a year of change, and one that nobody will forget. One of the credos of my school district is “Adapt and Adjust”, and that has never been more important than it was this year. With this in mind, I have deferred my Teacher on the Trail™ trail experience until the 2022 …

Announcing Our Trail Mail Contest Winners

Our first annual Trail Mail Art Contest was a tremendous success! We were thrilled to accept over 40 entries from students in grades 4-12 and from all over the country. A team of Iditarod Educators narrowed the field to ten finalists which were then judged by artists Jon and Jona Van Zyle. The Iditarod Education …

Learning in Nikolai

Paws Along the Trail with Hospitality Early this morning while mushers were traveling with their dogs through Finger Lake and Rainy Pass, I waited with a group of veterinarians, trail volunteers, communications people, media reporters, and others to jump on a plane and leave Anchorage.  We flew to the community of McGrath.  If you look …

Alaskan or Siberian?

Hi y’all!  Libby here! I’m an Alaskan Husky puppy and my Big Goal is to be a Sled Dog. I’ve learned a lot hanging around the Kennel.  Not just any dog can become a sled dog.  First of all, sled dogs have to love running and pulling sleds, and we need to be able to …

Get Ready to Visit Iditarod!

With the Iditarod Trail Committee announcing the historic route for the 2021 Race, The Gold Trail, all attention this year will focus on the historic town and checkpoint of Iditarod. Iditarod came into existence after the Christmas Day, 1908 gold strike on Otter Creek, a tributary of the Iditarod River. By the summer of 1909 …

Primary Source of the Month: January

Last month, we looked at the use of the Iditarod Trail as a mail trail by investigating trail mail. This month, we turn our focus to the use of the Iditarod Trail during the Gold Rush Days. The vault of the Miners and Merchants Bank is one of the few structures still standing in Iditarod …

If You “Mush” Know: Stopping a Team

This question comes from Mrs. Dagenais’ Class in Baltimore: How does a musher stop their team of sled dogs? Gary Paulsen describes in Dogteam the beauty of a winter night run with a team of dogs pulling the sled taking you on a wonderful ride along a trail. Paulsen shares the beauty of the energy …

Going North – The Rush Is On!

In September of 1898, the “Three Lucky Swedes” discovered gold on Anvil Creek, founded the Nome Mining District, and started a new rush to the North.  By 1898, Nome had a population of 10,000, many of whom had arrived for the Klondike Gold Rush.  When gold was discovered on the beaches of Nome, the rush …

“Sharing Our Stories” From Student Journalists in Takotna, Alaska

Sharing Our Story from Student Journalists attending Takotna Community School, Takotna, AK Mrs. Smith’s Class Starting the School Day My name is Elijah, am nine years old, and I am in third grade in Takotna, Alaska. I live on Mile 329 of the Iditarod Trail. My job the first week of school was to lead …

Gold and the Iditarod

 Paws Along the Trail with the Gold Rush Gold. Just hearing someone say the word creates interest and a desire to eavesdrop. The Iditarod Trail is remembered for the path it created for winter travel from the gold mines to the ports, usually by dog team.   Between the gold mines and mail carrying, dog teams …